Cost effective on-site leak repair of power transformers

Cost effective on-site leak repair of power transformers

Electrical energy generation and distribution have been essential factors in the economic development and progress of many regions around the world. Many countries are focused on expanding and maintaining their electrical grids to provide dependable and reliable energy to meet the energy needs of households, commercial establishments, and industries. According to the World Bank, a billion people worldwide still live without electricity, and hundreds of millions more live with unreliable or expensive power. An important element to reliable access to affordable electricity is the consistent operation of the many power transformers in the power grid, while the performance of the power transformers in substations and switchyards is essential for a properly functioning grid. The supply of electricity through this network of power transformers depends on their continuous operation. One issue that impacts the continuity and quality of electrical service is the leakage of dielectric oil used to dissipate the heat generated during the transformer operation. Quick and cost-effective repair of transformer oil leaks ensures reliable performance of the electrical network. The use of innovative sealant technology from Polywater for in-field repair of performance-degrading transformer oil leaks will be reviewed below. Compared to traditional repair processes, Polywater® sealant technology has proven to be a faster and more cost-effective oil leak remediation method.

One of the issues that impact the continuity and quality of electrical services of the transformer operation is the leakage of dielectric oil

Oil leaks occur in a variety of ways, such as pinholes, welding defects, and gasket and radiator cooling fin leaks. The loss of dielectric fluids from a power transformer has many deleterious effects. High temperatures within the transformer due to oil loss affect the quality and dependability of the supply of power. Additionally, high heat contributes to accelerated decomposition of the solid insulation of the transformers, which leads to accelerated aging and unreliable power quality. Leaks also provide a gateway for atmospheric gases, such as oxygen and nitrogen, into the transformer. They degrade oil quality and further accelerate cellulosic depolymerization. Any oil leak, no matter how small, is an open pathway for moisture to enter the transformer. Water in a transformer reduces its useful life and puts at risk the coordinated operation of the transformer and the electrical grid. The reduction in the number and severity of transformer oil leaks is critical to improved grid performance and power quality.

Vol. 7 Issue 4