Standards relevant to transformers – Part IV

Standards relevant to transformers – Part IV

Vol. 8 issue 1

BSI – British standards institution

Work on engineering standards started in Britain in 1901 on the initiative of the British Engineering Standards Committee under Sir John Wolfe Barry KCB (the engineer who designed London’s famous Tower Bridge). Later, the electrical section committee was constituted under Sir John Snell.

British Engineering Standards Association (BESA) issued the “Standardization Rules for Electrical Machinery” during the first decade of the 20th century. A tentative standard exclusively for transformers was issued in 1917 as Specification No. 72 ‘Electrical Performance of Transformers for Power and Lighting’. A further tentative standard for Transformer oil was issued in 1923 and this was reproduced in full in the first edition of The J & P Transformer Book, published in 1925 [1].

First standards for transformers and oil were issued in 1927 with numbers BSS: 171 “British Standard Specifications for the Electrical Performance of Transformers for Power and Lighting” & BSS: 148 “British Standard Specifications for Insulating Oils for Electrical Purposes (excluding cables)”. In the fourth edition of The J & P Transformer Book, published in 1928 [2], these two standards were reproduced in full, under the permission of BESA. In the above book, we can find the first national standards on transformers, as in use 90 years back. These two standards, along with the Code of Practice CP

1010 ‘Transformer Loading Guide’ were widely referred to and used in Britain and its colonies for the next half a century, undergoing several revisions. Later, these British Standards were replaced by individual national standards or IEC standards, as the colonies became independent countries. In 1961, there were nearly 40 British standards relevant to power and distribution transformers.

 

Designated as European Standards Organization by the European Commission, CENELEC is a non-profit technical organization set up under Belgian law

 

CENELEC – EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR ELECTROTECHNICAL STANDARDIZATION

CENELEC (FrenchComité Européen de Normalisation Électrotechnique) is the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization and is responsible for standardization in the electrotechnical engineering field [3]. CENELEC prepares voluntary standards that facilitatetrade between countries, create new markets, cut compliance costs and support the development of a Single European Market.

Designated as European Standards Organization by the European Commission, CENELEC is a non-profit technical organization set up under Belgian law. It was created in 1973 as a result of the merger of two previous European organizations: CENELCOM and CENEL.

 

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