USA: Dozens of break-ins examined by The Wall Street Journal show how regulators and policy makers’ orders stipulated to secure the power grid have still left tens of thousands of utility substations vulnerable to terrorist saboteurs.

Unsecure technology is a threat to the grid

USA: Dozens of break-ins examined by The Wall Street Journal show how regulators and policy makers’ orders stipulated to secure the power grid have still left tens of thousands of utility substations vulnerable to terrorist saboteurs.

America’s electric grid remains vulnerable both to physical attacks from saboteurs and Mother Nature, The Wall Street Journal informs. But there is a bigger problem looming. Regulators and policy makers are pushing technology onto the grid with easily picked locks, open backdoors and the equivalent of signs that say “Enter Here.” Such is the reality of internet-enabled devices that are at the centre of “smart” and “green” goals for the nation’s grids. Cybersecurity has taken a back seat despite clear evidence of hacking vulnerabilities of nearly every kind of internet-connected, smart-grid and green-energy device. It won’t do much good to physically secure key features of the grid while actually creating a cyber backdoor for hackers. But, inconveniently, making “connected” grids safe and secure will take a lot more time and money, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Source: The Wall Street Journal